Convenience is killing America

Think about this. Americans of average income can have more convenience today than at any other time in this country’s history. (Posit) In some cases, we don’t have to do anything that involves getting out of the car.

A waiter told me recently that people actually drive up first to their ‘curbside’ or whatever simp name they have given it. And then order. Then wait, checking sports scores, email, grocery lists, company business, and lining up a babysitter while waiting for the food to come to the car. Elapsed time: 12 minutes. Hot dinner for four in the back seat, while you check your bank balance as you leave the restaurant. You push Onstar, and ask for tickets to the baseball game a month from now.

At home, you browse Netflix while eating, and reading the snail mail. Amazon Prime is in your email box with the latest and greatest, sent to your house.

Someone cuts your lawn, because frankly, you can’t be bothered. You need to program the addresses of your daughter’s teammates for picking them up to take them to the soccer tournament this weekend.

You pay someone to cut your hair, shine your shoes, dryclean your clothing, wash and wax your car, and help you get organized. Change the oil, rotate the tires, drop kids at the after school dance.

Back at home meanwhile, Dad was using a laser to hang a photo straight in the family room. He hasn’t lifted anything heavier than a pen in ten years, and will have a heart attack next week. He doesn’t have time for that either.

The kids can play video games with consoles that the hardware alone would have taken a good size room 20 years ago. They have never known life without it. Their lives are completely digital from birth to death, and forever the transistors meet at Best Buy. Hallelujah.

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Published by

Mark Brooks

Independent Journalist/Photographer --- Retired Land Surveyor originally from Colorado. USN Veteran. Involved as a citizen and journalist in politics and open government locally and sometimes statewide. Interests: photography, music, justice and equality for everyone.

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